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beyond bullets: Show Me the Money Slide

Why wait until the end to show the result?

Good advice for any presenter - but how does this apply to developer presentations?

1. Show the finished product first. Show some bells and whistles.
2. Show how you got there from scratch (or somewhere nearby)
3. Show how the bells and whistles got added.

Even if you run out of time somewhere between 2-3, attendees get a take-away because they can see what the final results can be.


beyond bullets: Show Me the Money Slide

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