Saturday, January 31, 2004

Nooface: In Search of the Post-PC Interface

Great site that shows links to some of the new work being done on User interface. Although the first post talks about Sun's Project Looking Glass (a linux based replacement), check out the right hand list that showcases some 3D user interfaces for Windows as well!


Nooface: In Search of the Post-PC Interface

Nooface: In Search of the Post-PC Interface

Great site that shows links to some of the new work being done on User interface. Although the first post talks about Sun's Project Looking Glass (a linux based replacement), check out the right hand list that showcases some 3D user interfaces for Windows as well!


Nooface: In Search of the Post-PC Interface

Don't Read into things that just aren't there

I had an interesting email discussion today with someone who read (a little too much, I think) into my highlights of 2003 below so I thought I would clarify some points here:
 
1. I'm not referring to a single incident or discussion when discussing rants and raves in the Fox community. I read ProFox very lightly and only even heard about the Linux issues when discussing various topics with Ted Roche in late summer.
 
2. The person referred to in point #6 is a Jeff from a series of 1992 Compuserve threads when Microsoft first purchased Fox software. The discussions reached such a point that people were banned from threads and forums. I was not referring to anyone else. Any attempt to think otherwise is conspiracy theory. I think most people who were on CIS during 1992 will recall the threads I'm referring to.
 
3. Those of you who know me should know that I don't take cheap shots at people, especially if I wouldn't say it right to their face.
 
My highlights were precisely that, highlights - very few specifics - so jeez, don't read into things that just aren't there.

Wednesday, January 28, 2004

FW: Are You Professional?

Last night I watched the college basketlall game between Fullerton and Utah State. A local station picked up the feed from a southern California station. The SoCal station was responsible for all the production of game. For an organization that is supposed to be professional, it sure did look like amateur night. Here are just a few things that were wrong:


* The announcers constantly mispronounced the name of Mike Ahmad

* The announcers constantly referred to Utah State as Utah, which is a difference school with a different team and a different coach and even in a different city.

* The play-by-play announcer seemed to get lost at times. There would be dead silence as things were happening on the court

* Several times the camera was swishing around or the picture was switched to a different camera with such a bad angle that you missed seeing the play

* The graphics operator couldn't keep up with the score and sometimes gave the basket to the wrong team.


Today I got thinking about this and comparing it to what we do in our own computer business. Do you treat our customers as intelligent people? Do you really try to act in a professional manner and not just say you are a professional? Do you do mediocre work? Do you do your best day in and day out? Do you engage in professional development on a regular basis? Do you work and improving your computer and business skills?

I have a poster on my wall that I got from Despair, Inc. The poster has a picture of the Leaning Tower of Pisa. The caption reads, "Mediocrity -- It takes alot less time and most people won't notice the difference until it's too late." Don't be mediocre. Work at doing the job in the best way possible.





http://www.craigberntson.com/archives/2004_01_01_archive.asp#107488198427365195

Friday, January 23, 2004

Op-Ed: Rewarding the MVPs of the Business World

http://www.aynrand.org/medialink/superbowlceos.shtml

REWARDING THE MVPs OF THE BUSINESS WORLD

Like quarterbacks who reach the Super Bowl, successful CEOs are
indispensable to their companies and deserve their high salaries.

By Elan Journo

As millions of Americans watch the New England Patriots take on the Carolina
Panthers, every minute of the game will be scrutinized, from all angles and
with action replays. But, amid the cheers of victory and cries of
disappointment, you won't hear a whisper of complaint from fans about the
players' multi-million dollar salaries--$3.8 million on average for starting
quarterbacks, and far more to exceptional players. No one doubts that the
players have earned it, that the MVPs are indispensable to their teams, that
it is morally proper to reward achievement.

reviled as overpaid fat-cats. Astonished at pay packages as large as that of
Dell Inc.'s Michael Dell--America's third-highest paid CEO in 2003--people
ask themselves: "How can the work of a paper-pusher be worth $82 million a
year?"

The answer is that successful CEOs are as indispensable to their companies
as Super Bowl winning quarterbacks are to their teams. They earn their
rewards.

How big an influence can one man have on the fortunes of the entire
corporation? Consider the impact of Jack Welch on General Electric.

Wednesday, January 21, 2004

Xandros Desktop Top 10

Come on.... this sounds like a line from the formidable Microsoft Marketing department.

Ok - who am I to say? Maybe it is worth $39. I'm just frustrated because I've realized how useless BlueTooth really is - and am thinking about spending $140 on an SD Wi-Fi card.

Anyways - it looks interesting.... who knows what the future will bring?

Xandros Desktop Top 10: "Incredibly simple, foolproof updates to your programs and system."

Friday, January 16, 2004

Copy Protection & CDs

Not having receiving a new CD for quite some time, I was quite surprised to find that my new copy of Let It Be...Naked featured a copy protection scheme that effectively prevented me from including it in my CD collection.
 
Many of you will likely think I've been living under a rock - I haven't - I just haven't needed to buy a new CD. I knew they were doing some things for copy protection but EMI has really taken it to the level where it's unbelievable.
 
To play the CD on your computer, you need to install "their" program OR you effectively need to ruin the CD. Yes, supposedly this can be done by using a marker and going around the outside of the CD with it. That kind of scares me because after actually paying money for a CD, the last thing I want to do is possibly ruin it.
 
This isn't about circumventing licenses either. This is simply about wanting to listen to the music where I want. I have an AudioTron device (http://www.turtlebeach.com) that plays music on my stereo from all sources. I need to move the music there to run.
 
What this effectively does is tell me that these companies do not want my business. I would far rather purchase the music online for $0.99 a song instead of buying a CD. Thankfully that is precisely what some companies are doing.
 
So now, instead of being able to enjoy my music, I have to burn another copy of the data CD and then play around with the black pen. Unbelievable...